Sunday, June 25, 2017

Kiwis Eating Less Red Meat - Research



 

 

 

 

 

 

Kiwis Eating Less Red Meat - Research

By Fleur Revell
26 June 2017
More than half of Kiwis say they are eating less meat, and a quarter expect to be mostly meat-free by 2025, as they focus on their health and budget according to the results of a new survey.

It seems the days of a nightly meal of meat and two veg may soon be behind us too, with one in five of those surveyed (21%) saying they choose to have a meat-free dinner for more than half of the week.

The Bean Supreme survey which investigated the eating habits of more than 1,000 New Zealanders found that one in four (24%) of those surveyed expect to be mostly meat-free within the next seven years.

Health played a key role in their selection of a vegetarian meal choice with four in 10 (42%) respondents giving this reason, this was followed by cost (28%) and concerns for animal welfare or the environment 14 percent. Only two percent of those surveyed said they did not eat meat due to religious considerations.

Around 14% of Kiwi women and 13% of Kiwi men do not eat red meat, with health a primary driver for males (44% vs 41% of females) and cost more relevant to women (for 30% of women vs 25% of men).

The survey also found that Kiwis were more likely to reduce their meat consumption and instead, opt for vegetarian meals as they aged. According to the results, one in five (21%) 18-24 years olds (compared to half of those aged 65 or older) selected ‘health concerns’ as the main reason for choosing a meat-free meal.

Millennials aged 18-24 were the most common age group to believe they would follow a diet that was mainly meat-free over the coming decade.

When it came to special dietary requirements it was Aucklanders who said they were most likely to follow vegan or vegetarian nutritional plans with those in the Waikato/Bay of Plenty regions less keen on embracing this trend.

Wellingtonians and Otago/Southland residents were most open to adopting a flexitarian/semi-vegetarian approach to dining - with nine in ten (88%) removing meat from their diets at least once a week.

The survey also revealed that vegetarians and vegans were most frequently found to be aged 25-54, female and live in Auckland or Canterbury.

While more than eight in ten (81%) Kiwis include red meat in their diet, a seventh (14%) excluded red meat with 1% of the population identifying as vegan, 2% as vegetarian and almost one in 10 (9%) saying they ate poultry or fish but not red meat.

Liz O’Meara from Bean Supreme says it was interesting to see that a similar proportion of men and women chose not to eat meat but men were more likely to choose vegetarian meals for health reasons and women more likely to chose vegetarian options for their lower cost.

“Kiwis’ developing interest in a ‘flexitarian’ diet has led to the introduction of more products which fit this lifestyle option.

“According to new industry data, NZ sales of products made from plant based ingredients such as vegetarian burgers, sausages, tofu and falafel increased by over 20% in the last year alone,” she says.

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Written on behalf of Bean Supreme by Impact PR

 

Celebrating Diversity




Tonight , Mt Albert Baptist Church celebrated our Mosaic Global Cafe Night. Our survey showed there are 24 ethnic groups worshiping here. We have Malaysian Peter and Angie Seow who led in the worship with their beautiful music and song.

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Two Asian Stories




The world has always been pro males. The Asian women fare it worst. Women were sold as slaves, women were made to marry men they don’t know, some of these matches were made even when the girls were babies. Girls were molested, raped, impregnated and had their babies aborted or given away, beaten. The modern day insecure women subject themselves to get their breasts bigger or smaller.

In story one, two girls born in the 1920s. One “upstairs” as the rich pampered missy. The other “downstairs”, born to be the slave aka mui zai of the rich girl. Fate and victims of tradition brought them to Borneo, World War II aka Japanese War and finally to New Zealand.

In story two, a girl born in the 1960s, ran into trouble with the Communists, and teenage pregnancy. She ran to the big city of Singapore. Crisis after crisis plague her. Her whole world shattered and she committed suicide. She ended up in a mental institution.



cover:  出入平安 chūrù  Pingann Peace to all who enter and to those who leave

My latest book, published 2017.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Oppressed women

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4595990/Two-brothers-kept-mother-sister-slaves.html?ito=social-facebook

Shocking, more shocking and fiction than my fiction Book, Cry of Oppressed Women. When I wrote this book, some friends asked if I am overboard with the oppression. Time and again, oppression takes place. "This is the street in Bradford where Faisal Hussein, 25, and Arbaaz Ahmed, 19, kept their mother and sister as slaves "  and I am not stereotyping .



Shocking, more shocking and fiction than my fiction Book, Cry of Oppressed Women.

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Friday, June 9, 2017

Bethals


My husband's favourite place. Climbing 6 stories high, up 3 steps, slip down 2.

Bethal beach of New Zealand.


Tuesday, June 6, 2017

a different kind of oppression


http://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/201846444/primary-school-excludes-girl-with-period

Can't believe this kind of oppression. A 10-year-old girl was sent home from her primary school because it did not have a sanitary disposal unit for her to use, a public health sociologist says.

I wrote a book entitled "Cry of the Oppressed Women.

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Monday, June 5, 2017

Mum and the pig

I think of my parents and grand parents. I think of how the pig had played such an important part in the Chans and Kongs. Last year, I spent time in Sibu, sharing a bed with mum's sister, my aunty Ngui /Kong. I learned something interesting from my Aunty Ngui-Kong. My grandmother kong aka bodai reared pigs during the war. Just before my mother went to her match making session, she played with the newly born piglets, and the sow bit her heel. That heel was very painful and mum walked with a limp.
The Kongs explained that Mum was gardening and while digging with a changko, she hurt herself. When she wore her wedding gown, she still had a limp and the Chans said she was a cripple.
On the other side of the coin, it was the pig that attracted my Ah Tai, mum's grandmother to the Chans. The first time, Ah Tai landed at the Chan's jetty she exclaimed,"Wah, during the war, you have pork." Ah Kung was washing his pickle jar where he had kept his pickled pork.
It was a source of contention leading to a family feud. I wrote this n my From China to Borneo to Beyond and World War 2 in Borneo.

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Friday Floral : Cotoneaster

Image may contain: plant, tree, flower, outdoor and nature

 Cotoneaster /kəˈtoʊniːˈæstər/[2] is a genus of flowering plants in the rose family, Rosaceae, native to the Palaearctic region (temperate Asia, Europe, north Africa), with a strong concentration of diversity in the genus in the mountains of southwestern China and the Himalayas.[3] They are related to hawthorns C. simonsii is listed on the New Zealand National Pest Plant Accord preventing its sale and distribution because of its invasiveness.(Crataegus), firethorns (Pyracantha), photinias (Photinia) and rowans (Sorbus).

http://floralfridayfoto.blogspot.co.nz/

Saturday, June 3, 2017

service with a smile

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Top In Town Food City
There are some products that you can't get in bulk or not at the supermarket. I use a lot of baking soda for cleaning, and psyllium husk turmeric as health products. I even found a Thai tamarind.

The store is packed with products, is very busy so the items are fresh. So glad to be served by Gaurang Desai. He was very friendly, whilst busy, he had time to talk to be about the free food in the Paradise restaurant.

Save the world: Don't waste

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Paradise, Sandringham, Auckland

 591 Sandringham Rd Sandringham 1025 ·

 

The first thing that struck me as  I entered this restaurant in Sandringham  was the sign which says." Free food for people in need." I was told they don't throw away excess food, but packed them nicely for people to take away. They also included some apples.

If only more restaurateurs would do this.